Modern LanguagesWestern Arts and Humanities

Comparative Literature and Culture Courses 2014-15

clc1020CLC 1020 From Homer to Picasso: Western Culture Across the Ages

You can’t really know who you are unless you know where your culture comes from. This course uses art, architecture, music, and literature to understand how we happen to be where we are in 2014. Come to one lecture and you will stay for the year!

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clc1040CLC 1040: Ideas and Apps that Changed the World

Gain an edge by devoting one credit to the greatest game changing ideas ever – the ones that made our culture what it is. Explore the ground-breaking ideas that revolutionized societies and cultures. Identify their application in our public and private lives through textual and visual material. Trust the Comparative Literature multicultural and multilingual approach to engage you with inspiring analysis of ideas and terms such as platonic love, paradox, , progress, alienation, social networks, otherness, redemption, unconscious, beautiful, sublime, academia, manuscript, utopia … This course can change you. 

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clc2103b CLC 2103B: The Grotesque

It scares you till you like it; it plays on fantastic chords until you let down your defenses and join the tune; it may be disgusting to the point of horror, but after it takes you on uncanny rollercoasters it brings you back home to a place you’ve never been before. It’s called grotesque and it’s livelier than ever. Yet Gogol’s disappearing nose and Poe’s half-buried black cat, Bulgakov’s band of demons in Stalin’s Moscow and Kafka’s hunger artist, Leonardo’s scary-funny drawings and Apuleius’ golden ass, Lovecraft’s reanimator, Grosz’s monstrous cops and Jodorowsky’s whacked moviemaking may tip you off that the grotesque has been as lively throughout history (like in this Goya etching:)

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clc2112bimage CLC 2112B: The Graphic Novel In Print and Online around the World

Have you ever read comic books as a child but feel you have now “grown out of it”?  Comic Books were generally categorized as a juvenile genre, read for pleasure and as an escape from serious contemplation. However, artists have recently taken to narrate traumatic historical topics such as the Holocaust (Maus), or retell the private dilemmas of young women caught between revolution and exile (Persepolis) through the Graphic Novel medium. In this course, we will study and apply trauma theory and comics theory, talk about autobiography and world history, analyze pictures as well as texts, and possibly create our own comic memoir.

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clc2117b CLC 2117B: Funny Money: Commerce and Comedy
Money might not make the world go round, but as this course will show you, the impact of cold hard cash on human relations has certainly made the world laugh for many centuries. Whether the laughter is socially redemptive, as in Aristophanes's The Clouds, or bitterly satirical, as in Dante's Inferno, or sexually charged, as in E. L. James's Fifty Shades of Grey, you can be sure that it will be right on the money.

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clc2125imageCLC 2125A: Battle of the Sexes
Boy meets Girl. Girl resists Boy. Boy besieges Girl. Girl conquers Boy. Boy and Girl wonder why their conflict began and how it might end. Both turn to greats works of art and literature for insight into the competitive game of courtship, the rules of amorous engagement, the strategies of seduction, the spoils of sexual victory, and the power struggle within marriage.

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clc2132aimageCLC 2132A/Italian 2240A: Italian Journey
Travel through three major capitals of Italian culture, Florence, Venice, and Naples. Explore the variety of their artistic splendor, enjoy the pleasure of their literary and filmic tradition and understand crucial moments of their socio-political history. Meet emblematic historical figures such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Machiavelli, The Medici. Our journey spans from the Renaissance to the present and unfolds following the footsteps of illustrious travelers such as Goethe, Dickens and Stendhal, whose descriptions of the Bel Paese have watermarked the expectations of millions of tourists. Get on board, you too, for the everlasting Grand Tour!

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clc2134imageCLC 2134A: Bombay to Mumbai: Hinduism and Literature
Behind Bollywood, a city of dreams, lies a real city which has dramatically altered its identity from Bombay, Old India's retrospective gateway, into Mumbai, progressive capital of the globalized New India. This course will explore the ways in which the city's competing visions of itself, as expressed in contemporary Indian literature and cinema, continue to be shaped by ancient Hindu myths and ethical principles.

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clc2200imageCLC 2200F: Exploring Comparative Literature and Culture
How do different literatures illuminate one another, or enter into dialogue with other disciplines, media or forms of art? What happens when texts or cultural products cross chronological, cultural, linguistic, or geographic boundaries? Do translation, adaptation, transformation foster understanding and communication among different cultures? We will explore the questions and practices of the field as you hone your writing, research and critical thinking skills. 

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clc2206gimageCLC 2206G/Spanish 2215G: Exploring Hispanic Cultures I
In this course the instructor and the students will explore the cultural expressions of the Hispanic World since before America until the 21 Century.  Student will do research on the diverse origins and forms, for instance, of music from Argentinean tango (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUAPf_ccobc) and Latin-jazz (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zy87C4EQnMc) or the Baroque painting of Diego de Velázquez (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Las_Meninas) and the modernist painting of Frida Khalo. The course also aims to improve the Spanish languages oral and written skills of all students.

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clc2207imageCLC 2207F/Spanish 2216F: Exploring Hispanic Cultures II
Explore Hispanic Culture through diverse case studies in literature, film, popular culture, and digital Spanish. Study with a core faculty member in Hispanic Studies, supported by an interesting line-up of Guest Speakers, experts in their field. Connect what you learn to your London, Ontario community through Community Service-Learning (CSL).

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clc2208gimageCLC 2208G/Italian 2215G: Exploring Italian Cultures
This is a team-taught course that aims to introduce students to reading, writing and researching about Italian culture and its contribution to the global context. Students will acquire foundations through case studies concerning arts, cinema, history of language, politics, and pop culture.

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clc2209gimageCLC 2209G/German 2215G: Exploring German Culture
What impact did the Berlin wall (1961-89) have on life and art? What are the functions of the 18th Century epistolary novel in terms of today’s media? Do these two questions relate to each other? Begin exploring significant German literature, visual art and film while building the conversation, reading, writing and research skills needed in German for that exploration.

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clc3300gimageCLC 3300G: Literary and Cultural Theory
Explore a broad range of theories from Plato to the hottest contemporary trends, in a global perspective. Discover how the vocabulary and concepts of literary interpretation travel across time and cultures, and learn how to use them to think with/through a variety of literary texts worldwide.

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clc3340fimageCLC 3340F/German 4451F: Medieval Literature and Culture
If you are interested what life was like when the first European universities came into being then this course is for you. Find out how people in the Middle Ages built, dressed, ate, travelled, healed, hunted, worshipped, loved and learnt as Ancient Greek and Arab knowledge became widely available in Latin translation.

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clc3342imageCLC 3342F: Baroque Literature and Culture
The 17th century was a period of sensual art, architecture, literature and music all designed to awe and delight people. Paintings are often sensationalistic (and bloody); the plays are full of passion; and the churches are magnificent. Come take the tour with us!

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clc3351gimageCLC 3351G/German 3360G: Intermediality: Where Literature and other Media Meet
What happens to a story as it moves from the medium of language to the medium of film?  Come and find out the differences, commonalities and problems associated with the (mis)matching of two ways of representing reality.  We will explore ways of “seeing" with words and “telling" with images... or vice versa. 

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clc4401gimageCLC 4401G/ Italian 4406G: Research Seminar: Dante
What if you dumped your old flame and she died and you found yourself another and your first love came back from the dead? There would be hell to pay, as Dante memorably reveals in his search for the meaning of Beatrice as the key to meaning in the universe. This course will follow Dante's quest for meaning from the bounded world of Florentine certainties (from which he was exiled in 1302) into the imaginary worldscapes of his pilgrimage through the afterlife.

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