Department of PhilosophyWestern Arts and Humanities

1000 Level Courses

Philosophy 1020 - Introduction to Philosophy
Philosophy 1030A - Understanding Science
Philosophy 1040F - Ethics, Law and Politics
Philosophy 1130G - Big Ideas
Philosophy 1200 - Critical Thinking (Blended Online/In-person)
Philosophy 1200 - Critical Thinking (Distance Studies)
Philosophy 1305G - Questions of the Day

Philosophy 1020 - Introduction to Philosophy

Instructor: D. Klimchuk

Through readings, film and other media this course explores debates about knowledge, truth, reality, religion, morality, politics, and the meaning of life. A weekly tutorial hour will help students to develop skills of analysis and expression.

Course Outline

Philosophy 1030A - Understanding Science

Instructor: W. Myrvold

This non-essay course introduces conceptual issues about science: What distinguishes science from non-science? Are there limits to what science can or should explain? What does science tell us about reality? What is the relationship between science and religion? What is the role and value of science in a democratic society?

Course Outline

Philosophy 1040F - Ethics, Law and Politics

Instructor:  T. Isaacs

Many problems faced by individuals and societies lie at the intersection of ethics, law, and politics. This course will consider issues that can be analyzed along ethical, legal, and/or political lines, with a focus on understanding the differences between moral, legal, and political arguments and solutions to contemporary societal problems.

Course Outline

Philosophy 1130G - Big Ideas

Instructor: R. DiSalle

This course will explore some of the "big ideas" that frame (and limit) our thinking in contemporary Western culture - including science, religion and public and personal decision-making - ideas that we are all familiar with but that are rarely subjected to careful examination. We will investigate these ideas and the interconnections between them, focusing on where they came from, why they matter and what effects and implications they have for how we think and what we do. The "big ideas" we will consider include skepticism, God, the scientific method, materialism, democracy, evolution, and property, among others.

Course Outline

Philosophy 1200 (200) - Critical Thinking (Blended online/in-person instruction)

Instructor: A. Mendelovici

This course offers students important critical reading, writing, and thinking skills for being successful at university and in the workplace. Students are taught criteria behind language use, which motivates the criteria of good reasoning. Based on these criteria students learn to represent the structure of complicated reasoning and how to assess it and construct it, with specific techniques for deductive and inductive reasoning. These methods are then applied to practical reasoning, particularly in the context of ethical decision making, as well as scientific and numerical reasoning. The course concludes by examining belief acquisition and the nature of bias using converging evidence from a number of research disciplines.

Course Outline

Philosophy 1200 (650) - Critical Thinking (Distance)

Instructor: A. Mendelovici

This course offers students important critical reading, writing, and thinking skills for being successful at university and in the workplace. Students are taught criteria behind language use, which motivates the criteria of good reasoning. Based on these criteria students learn to represent the structure of complicated reasoning and how to assess it and construct it, with specific techniques for deductive and inductive reasoning. These methods are then applied to practical reasoning, particularly in the context of ethical decision making, as well as scientific and numerical reasoning. The course concludes by examining belief acquisition and the nature of bias using converging evidence from a number of research disciplines.

Course Outline

Philosophy 1305G - Questions of the Day

Instructor: C. McLeod

This course develops students' ability to approach disputed questions by seeing them from both sides, so that they reach their own view only after respecting a broad range of argument.

Course Outline