Department of PhilosophyWestern Arts and Humanities

2000 Level Courses

Philosophy 2006 - The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Witchcraft
Philosophy 2010G - Philosophy of Food
Philosophy 2020 - Basic Logic
Philosophy 2021A - Oppositions and Paradoxes
Philosophy 2032G - Einstein for Everyone
Philosophy 2033B - Introduction to Environmental Philosophy
Philosophy 2044G - Introduction to Philosophy of Psychiatry
Philosophy 2061F - Science vs. Religion: The Epistemological Conflict
Philosophy 2065F - Evil
Philosophy 2065G - Evil
Philosophy 2070E - Ethics and Society
Philosophy 2071E - Biomedical Ethics (Distance Studies)
Philosophy 2073F - Death
Philosophy 2073G - Death
Philosophy 2074F - Business Ethics
Philosophy 2074G - Business Ethics
Philosophy 2074G - Business Ethics (Distance Studies)
Philosophy 2077G- Gender and Sexuality
Philosophy 2078G - Ethics for a Digital World
Philosophy 2079G - Sports Ethics
Philosophy 2080 - Philosophy of Law
Philosophy 2080 - Philosophy of Law (Distance Studies)
Philosophy 2083F - Terrorism

Philosophy 2006 - The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Witchcraft

Instructor: E. Rossiter

Course Outline

Philosophy 2010G - The Philosophy of Food

Instructors: B. Hill, H,. Lagerlund

The course aims to present philosophical reflections on food and give the students a better understanding of the food system as well as its vast implications for us individually and for the world at large.  Issues dealt with in the course for example include the treatment of animals, moral and political dimensions of genetically modified food, hunger and obligation to the poor, the role of food in gender, personal and natiional identity, and what role does food play in the good life. The course aims to do this both through reading and philosophical discussions in the classroom, but also through a Service Learning component. As part of this students will be placed in the London Community and carry out a project in the local food system. It involves a two hour/week commitment outside class for 10 weeks.

Course Outline

Philosophy 2020 - Basic Logic

Instructors: E. Desjardins/C. Dyck

This course is intended as a basic introduction to formal techniques of logical analysis and the evaluation of arguments. No prior knowledge of philosophy, logic or mathematics is required. We will cover the formal syntax and semantics of sentential logic and first-order predicate logic (and some modal logic, time permitting).

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Philosophy 2021A - Oppositions and Paradoxes

Instructor: J. Bell

In this course we will investigate the role played in philosophical and scientific thought by basic oppositions - such as the Continuous and the Discrete, the One and the Many, the Finite and the Infinite. We shall also analyze the many paradoxes that have arisen in the history of philosophy and science - e.g. Zeno's paradoxes, the Liar Paradox, Russell's paradox, paradoxes of the infinite, and paradoxes arising in relativity theory, quantum theory and time travel.

Course Outline

Philosophy 2032G - Einstein for Everyone

Instructor: C. Hoefer

In this course we will come to an understanding of the theoretical achievements of the greatest 20th-century physicist, Albert Einstein. Wihtout presupposing any mathematical background, we will come to grips with both Special Relativity, which overthrew the absolute nature of time, and General Relativity, which eliminated the force of gravity and gave us a new understanding of space-time geometry as dynamic, curved, and interacting with matter and energy. But Einstein was as much a philosopher as a physicist. We will study the ways in which his philosophical thinking influenced Einstein's work, playing decisive roles in both the creation of his Relativity theories and his rejection of Quantum Mechanics.

Course Outline

Philosophy 2033B - Introduction to Environmental Philosophy

Instructor: E. Desjardins

This introduction to environmental philosophy draws extensively from epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of science. It offers reflections on issues arising in disciplines such as conservation biology, restoration ecology, climate sciences, sustainability studies, and political ecology. This course is also a great opportunity to develop advanced skills in formulating philosphical issues and exchanging ideas with peers in structured group discussions.

Course Outline

Philosophy 2044G - Introduction to Philosophy of Psychiatry

Instructor: L. Charland

An introduction to core issues in the philosophy of psychiatry. Topics will usually include: a survey of historical and contemporary theories of the nature of mental disorder and its treatment; case studies designed to highlight controversies surrounding specific mental disorders, most notably, Depressive Disorders, Personality Disorders, Eating Disorders and the Psychoses.

Course Outline

Philosophy 2061F - Science vs. Religion: The Epistemological Conflict

Instructor: J. Thorp

This course studies the epistemological clash between religion and science, looking especially at evolutionary theory, cosmology, the physics of time and miracles.  It also studies attempts to reconcile these two systems of knowledge. Finally, it examines the science of religion: anthropological theories of religion and the cognitive science of religion.

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Philosophy 2065F (002) - Evil

instructor: TBA

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Philosophy 2065G - Evil

Instructor: TBA

Course Outline

Philosophy 2070E - Ethics and Society

This course is devoted to an in-depth moral philosophical study of Canadian public policy and law governing various controversial moral issues, including the use of human embryos in scientific research, abortion, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, conflict over appropriate medical care, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, the distribution of health care to Canadians, the distribution of health care to the global poor, the use of non-human animals, the regulation of prostitution, of incest, of bestiality and of the environment.

instructor: A. Skelton

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Philosophy 2071E - Biomedical Ethics (Distance)

Instructor: TBA

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Philosophy 2073F - Death

Instructor: S. Brennan

In this course we will examine the meaning and moral significance of death, as well as the implications of being conscious of one's own mortality. Drawing upon both classical and contemporary philosophical texts, we will approach the topic of death by attempting to answer some of the following questions: When is something considered dead? What, if anything, survives the bodily death of a person? Should death be feared? Is suicide ever rational? What are we thinking of when we try to think of no longer existing? Does the inevitability of death make life meaningless? If death isn't bad for a person, does that mean murder is morally okay?

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Course Outline

Philosophy 2073G - Death

Instructor: TBA

Course Outline

Philosophy 2074F - Business Ethics

Instructor: D. Proessel

It is sometimes said that the phrase "business ethics" is an oxymoron. In this course we will attempt to dispel this popular conception. By working our way through many of the moral issues to which the practice of business gives rise, we will show that the interests of business people and moral philosophers converge. Topics include: What is the nature of moral reasoning> Do corporations have social responsibilities? What social responsibilities do corporations have when operating in the global context? Are there universal ethical principles which can guide the conduct of multinational corporations? Do international sweatshops violate human rights? What are the rights of employess in the workplace? Do employess have the right to due process? Is affirmative action morally justifiable? Is business bluffing ethical? When is advertising ethically questionable? How much information about a product is a corporation morally obligated to disclose to consumers and how and to whom should this information be disclosed? Can the free market be justified? What is the appropriate level of taxation? What constitutes a just distribution of the goods and services produced by society?

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Philosophy 2074G - Business Ethics

Instructor: D. Proessel

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Philosophy 2074G - Business Ethics (Distance)

Instructor: R. Robb

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Philosophy 2077G - Gender and Sexuality

instructor: J. Epp

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Philosophy 2078G - Ethics for a Digital World

Instructor: S. Brennan

Have you ever wondered if something you're about to do online is right or wrong? When does downloading count as theft? Is cyber sex cheating? Does a hacker's code of ethics make any sense? Is online bullying worse than other forms of bullying? Students will explore these questions and others through a study of both ethical theory and a series of cases in the burgeoning and important field of digital ethics. You'll learn what traditional ethics has to say about these questions and also learn the ways in whicih life online is stretching and changing our moral cencepts.

Course Outline

Philosophy 2079F - Sports Ethics

Instructor: S. Brennan

Interested in the role of sports in society? Come study sports ethics. We'll be exploring a lot of tough questions such as: What role do athletic pursuits play in the good life? What makes cheating wrong? Should performance enhancing drugs ever be permissible in sport? Why don't men and women complete against each other? When (if ever) should we perform six texts on athletes? Should disabled athletes using adaptive technology be able to participate in sport at all levels? Do professional athletes deserve their salaries? Should children be allowed to play risky sports? When is government funding for sports justified? Are there any risks too great for athletes to take? What role should sports teams play in university life? What makes someone a good fan?

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Course Outline

Philosophy 2080 - Philosophy of Law

Instructor: J. Hildebrand

We will study the fundamental concepts of law, and the philosophical principles on which they are based. The course is divided into four sections, two each term, as follows: the first term will be spent on tort law and contract law, the second term on criminal law and constitutional law. There will also be an introduction to the basic structure of our court system, the difference between statute law and common law, and some basic knowledge of the legal process.

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Philosophy 2080 - Philosophy of Law (Distance)

instructor: J. Hildebrand

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Philosophy 2083F - Terrorism

Instructor: TBA

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