Department of PhilosophyWestern Arts and Humanities

2200 Level Courses

Philosophy 2200F (001) - Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 2200F (002) - Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 2202G (001) - Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy 2202G (002) - Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy 2250 - Logic
Philosophy 2260F - Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 2300G - Philosophy of Science
Philosophy 2355G - Sustainability (Distance Studies)
Philosophy 2400G - Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy 2410F - Philosophy of Emotion
Philosophy 2500F - Introduction to Theory of Knowledge
Philosophy 2500G - Introduction of Theory of Knowledge
Philosophy 2555F - Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy
Philosophy 2700F - Introduction to Ethics and Value Theory
Philosophy 2700G - Introduction to Ethics and Value Theory
Philosophy 2702F - Modes of Normative Reasoning
Philosophy 2703G - Modes of Normative Reasoning
Philosophy 2710G - Reproductive Ethics
Philosophy 2715G - Health Care Ethics
Philosophy 2720G - The Ethics of Professional Relationships
Philosophy 2730F - Media Ethics
Philosophy 2821G - Philosophy of Law

Philosophy 2200F (001) - Ancient Philosophy

Instructor: J. Thorp

This course surveys the work of some of the main figures in Greek and Roman philosophy.  It is divided into four roughly equal parts. The first studies the Presocratic Philosophers, approximately 600 to 400 BCE.  The second and third focus on the work of Plato and Aristotle, approximately 400-300 BCE.  The final part surveys the Hellenistic Schools: Epicureanism, Stoicism, Skepticism, and Neoplatonism, taking us to approximately 300 CE.  Needless to say, the subject matter here is oceanic in extent: it is perhaps best to think of the course as taking a series of judiciously selected soundings into that ocean.

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Philosophy 2200F (002) - Ancient Philosophy

Instructor: L. Falkenstein

An overview of the predominant theories of nature and knowledge in Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy.

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Philosophy 2202G (001) - Early Modern Philosophy

Instructor: C. Dyck

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Philosophy 2202G (002) - Early Modern Philosophy

Instructor: L. Falkenstein

A survey of natural philosophy and epistemology in the Early Modern period focusing on the interplay between philosophy and the natural sciences and philosophy and early modern religious controversies.

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Philosophy 2250 - Logic

Instructor: G. Marti

Logic is the study of valid reasoning.  In this course we will study the relation of logical consequence, i.e., the relation that holds between the premises and the conclusion of a valid argument and we will learn methods to assess the validity of arguments. We will study the language of first-order logic, a formal language in which the structure of arguments cna be concisely and perspicuously represented. We will also learn to symbolize formally the structure of arguments couched in natural language and we will study semantic and syntactic methods to assess the validity of formal arguments. Philosophical problems of formal logic will also be discussed and some metatheoretical results proving the adequacy of methods to assess validity will be explored.

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Philosophy 2260F - Philosophy of Language

Instructor: N. McGinnis

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Philosophy 2300G - Philosophy of Science

Instructor: R. DiSalle

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Philosophy 2355 - Sustainability (Distance)

Instructor: E. Desjardins

Everyone agrees that we should pursue the ideal of sustainability.  But what ought to be sustained, and what is required to make that possible? Some experts now suggest that sustainability requires resilient, life-supporting social-ecological systems as well as intergenerational justice. This course explores this proposal and fosters reflection on the philosophical issues it raises.

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Philosophy 2400G - PHilosophy of Mind

Instructor: C. Young

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Philosophy 2410F - Philosophy of Emotion

Instructor: L. Charland

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Philosophy 2500F - Introduction to Theory of Knowledge

Instructor: J. Marsh

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Philosophy 2500G - Introduction to Theory of Knowledge

Instructor: G. Barker

This course is an introduction to epistemology or theory of knowledge. It focuses on the core questions of epistemology: What is knowledge? What, if anything, do we know? How do we know it? More specific topics include the nature of perception, belief, justification and truth; the sources of knowledge; skeptical questions concerning the extent of our knowledge; and the role of social context as reflected in debates about relativism, social construction, and feminist epistemology. We begin by exploring the history of epistemological thought in Western philosophy, from its roots in Ancient philosophy through to the early 20th century. We then turn to the contemporary scene, examining current debates about the nature of knowledge (a topic of renewed controversy!), naturalized epistemology, theories of truth, and whether justification depends on factors internal or external to the mind of the knower.

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Philosophy 2555F - Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy

Instructor: D. Proessel

This course focues on some of the major philosophers of the existential movement, including most notably Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger and Sartre. We will examine the different ways these philosophers challenge traditional dualisms between mind and matter, subject and object, and how, in doing so, they provide us new and insightful ways of thinking about the conditions of human existence and what it means to transcend and create meaning of out of these conditions.

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Philosophy 2700F - Introduction to Ethics and Value Theory

Instructor: R. Robb

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Philosophy 2700G - Introduction to Ethics and Value Theory

Instructor: M. Milde

This course provides an introduction to a number of fundamental issues in the field of Ethics. Somewhat perversely, we will start by examining a couple of concepts that are traditionally construed as challenges to morality: egoism and ethical relativism. Egoism opposes morality to the interests of particular individuals. Why, it asks, should moral commands take precedence over individual self-interest? Why should I give up some advantage so that someone else might get a benefit? Relativism makes the claim that there are no universally and ahistorically true moral principles: the rightness or wrongness of an action is said to be relative to, or depend on, the values held by a particular group or community

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Philosophy 2702F - Modes of Normative Reasoning 1

Instructor: B. Hoffmaster

The goal of this course is to understand the nature of morality, law and bioethics by examining the various methods of decision making they use and the conceptions of rationality, hence objectivity, implicit in those methods. The decision-making approaches considered in this course are the application of theories nad principles to problems (so-called "applied ethics") case-based reasoning or casuistry and interpretation.

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Philosophy 2703G - Modes of Normative Reasoning 2

Instructor: B. Hoffmaster

The goal of this course and its predecessor companion course (Philosophy 2702F) is to understand the nature of morality, law and bioethics by examining the various methods of decision making they use and the conceptions of rationality implicit in them. The approaches studied in this course are narratives and contextualism, followed hy the presentation of a process-based concept of reason that can account for the rationality of the judgment that pervades all forms of normative reasoning.

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Philosophy 2710G - Reproductive Ethics

Instructor: C. McLeod

Reproductive ethics is a sub-discipline of bioethics that deals with moral issues related to biological reproduction and reproductive health care.  Philosophers who do reproductive ethics ask the following sorts of questions: Whether, or under what circumstances, should people reproduce? Should they ever choose adoption or childlessness over reproduction? What grounds a right to reproduce or a right not to reproduce? How should people reproduce, especially when they cannot do so without medical assistance? Is it ever appropriate, for example, for them to pay a woman to gestate a child for them? Should there be limits on who can reproduce? We will analyse these sorts of quesitons and pay particular attention to why they are difficult: that is, to why reasonable people could disagree about how to answer them.

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Philosophy 2715G - Health Care Ethics

Instructor: C. Weijer

Ethical issues in health care represent some of the most pressing issues faced by Canadians.  In this course, students will learn about the most important bioethical issues across the human life span, from conception to death. The course is recommended for students considering a career in the health professions, or those who seek a deeper understanding of contemporary social issues.  No background in philosophy is assumed.

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Philosophy 2720G - The Ethics of Professional Relationships

Instructor: B. Hoffmaster

This course will examine the foundations of professional ethics and an array of specific ethical issues that arise for professionals and the people they serve. Questions to be considered include: What is a profession? What is professional ethics, and how is professional ethics related to philosophical moral theories? What are the qualities of a good professional? What special obligations do professionals have to their clients, to their professions and to society?

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Philosophy 2730F - Media Ethics

Instructor: R. Robb

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Philosophy 2821G - Philosophy of Law

Instructor: D. Klimchuk

An introduction to the philosophy of law.  We will cover a broad range of topics, including: Liability in contract and tort law, criminal responsibility, the justification of punishment, freedom of expression, the enforcement of morality, civil disobedience, and jurisprudence - that area of philosophy of law that tries to answer the surprisingly difficult question, "What is law"?

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