Department of PhilosophyWestern Arts and Humanities

2200 Level Courses

Philosophy 2200F (001) - Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 2202G (001) - Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy 2250 - Logic
Philosophy 2260G - Introduction to Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 2300F - Philosophy of Science
Philosophy 2310F - Philosophy of Physics
Philosophy 2350G - The Darwinian Revolution
Philosophy 2370G - Science and Values
Philosophy 2410F - Philosophy of Emotion
Philosophy 2500G - Introduction to Theory of Knowledge
Philosophy 2557G - Existentialism
Philosophy 2700F - Introduction to Ethics and Value Theory
Philosophy 2710F - Reproductive Ethics
Philosophy 2715G - Health Care Ethics
Philosophy 2730G - Media Ethics

Philosophy 2200F - Ancient Philosophy

Instrutor: D. Henry

This course studies four key movements in ancient philosophy: Platonism, Aristotelianism, Epicureanism, and Stoicism. This course will provide students with an introduction to these movements, which helped shape the foundations of Western philosophy and science. We shall examine such questions as: What is the underlying nature of reality? Is the fundamental state of the universe motion or stability? Is knowledge possible? If so, how do we acquire it? Can we have knowledge of a changing world or does knowledge require eternal, unchanging objects (e.g. Plato’s Forms)? What is philosophy and how should it be practiced? What is the nature of happiness and how does one attain it? How many kinds of friendship are there? Is friendship necessary for happiness?

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Philosophy 2202G (001) - Early Modern Philosophy

Instructor: B. Hill

A critical examination of key works of selected figures of the 17th and 18th centuries.

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Philosophy 2250 - Logic

Instructor: J. Bell

Logic is the study of valid reasoning.  In this course we will study the relation of logical consequence, i.e., the relation that holds between the premises and the conclusion of a valid argument and we will learn methods to assess the validity of arguments. We will study the language of first-order logic, a formal language in which the structure of arguments cna be concisely and perspicuously represented. We will also learn to symbolize formally the structure of arguments couched in natural language and we will study semantic and syntactic methods to assess the validity of formal arguments. Philosophical problems of formal logic will also be discussed and some metatheoretical results proving the adequacy of methods to assess validity will be explored.

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Philosophy 2260G - Philosophy of Language

Instructor: R. Stainton

A survey of contemporary and historical philosophical works on language. Topics may include: What is a language? How are language and thought related? Does linguistic meaning come from the world, communicative activity, or the mind? Authors may include , among others: Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Austin, Grice and Chomsky.

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Philosophy 2300F- Philosophy of Science

Instructor: W. Myrvold

A discussion of conceptual problems which fall between science and philosophy, as well as broader epistemological issues concerning theory change and the concept of progress in science.

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Philosophy 2310F - Philosophy of Physics

Instructor: R. DiSalle

An examination of philosophical problems to which modern physical theories of quantum mechanics and relativity have given rise. No previous formal training in physics and mathematics will be presupposed.

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Philosophy 2350G - The Darwinian Revolution

Instructor: W. Myrvold

An introduction to the philosophical ideas and questions of the Darwinian Revolution, this course examines the theory of evolution from its roots in ancient philosophy to contemporary debates within biology, with an emphasis on the pivotal work of Darwin himself.

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Philosophy 2370G  - Science and Values

Instuctor:: K. Okruhlik

A study of the relationships between scientific practice, cultural institutions, and human values. Attention will be devoted to such topics as the commercialization of research, military research, genetically modified organisms, and the study of race and gender.

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Philosophy 2410F - Philosophy of Emotion

Instructor: L. Charland

Do emotions interfere with reason and morality or are they required for both? Are emotions primarily biological or are they social constructions? These and other questions will be addressed using a variety of readings ranging from contemporary analytic and feminist philosophy to modern neurobiology and psychology.

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Philosophy 2500G - Introduction to Theory of Knowledge

This course is an introduction to epistemology or theory of knowledge. It focuses on the core questions of epistemology: What is knowledge? What, if anything, do we know? How do we know it? More specific topics include the nature of perception, belief, justification and truth; the sources of knowledge; skeptical questions concerning the extent of our knowledge; and the role of social context as reflected in debates about relativism, social construction, and feminist epistemology. We begin by exploring the history of epistemological thought in Western philosophy, from its roots in Ancient philosophy through to the early 20th century. We then turn to the contemporary scene, examining current debates about the nature of knowledge (a topic of renewed controversy!), naturalized epistemology, theories of truth, and whether justification depends on factors internal or external to the mind of the knower.

Instructor: G. Barker

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Philosophy 2557G - Existentialism

Instructor: H. Fielding

We will consider the meaning of human existence, including issues of freedom, agency, and relations among humans. Drawing on classic and contemporary texts, such as those from Nietzsche, Sartre, and Beauvoir, among others, this course will consider how we meaningfully encounter our world and interact and engage with others.

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Philosophy 2700F - Introduction to Ethics and Value Theory

Instructor: A. Skelton

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important philosophical approaches to ethics and value theory. We will focus in part on the historically important moral theories found in John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism and in Immanuel Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals and in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and in part on contemporary reactions to them. In our discussion of these we will be concerned with the following questions: What is non-instrumentally good? What is non-instrumentally evil? Are consequences the only thing that matter when thinking about the nature of right and wrong? What else might matter besides consequences? Are there constraints on what we are permitted to do in the service of good ends? Ought we to care about things other than right actions? Ought we to care about the kind of person it is desirable to be? What would such a person look like? How important is morality in a life that is well lived or good?

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Philosophy 2710F - Reproductive Ethics

Instructor:  C. McLeod

A study of current issues in reproductive ethics, such as abortion, prenatal diagnosis, and infertility treatment. Appropriate methods for approaching these questions and for dealing with complex issues in bioethics generally are examined.

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Philosophy 2715G - Health Care Ethics

Instructor: C. Weijer

Ethical issues in health care represent some of the most pressing issues faced by Canadians.  In this course, students will learn about the most important bioethical issues across the human life span, from conception to death. The course is recommended for students considering a career in the health professions, or those who seek a deeper understanding of contemporary social issues.  No background in philosophy is assumed.

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Philosophy 2730G - Media Ethics

Instructor: D. Proessel

A study of ethical issues in media, including such topics as: the reasonable limits of free expression; intellectual property and the public domain; official secrets and access to information; regulating online content; commercial databases and informational privacy; cameras in the courtroom; plagiarism and piracy; defamation; hactivism and the hacker ethic.

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