Department of PhilosophyWestern Arts and Humanities

3000 Level Courses

Philospohy 3003F - Plato
Philosophy 3006G - Aristotle
Philosophy 3027F - Berkeley
Philosophy 3170F - Topics in the History of Ethics
Philosophy 3201B - Special Topics in Logical Theory
Philosophy 3310F - Philosophy of Time and Chance
Philosophy 3320F - Quantum Mechanics
Philosophy 3410G - Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy 3420F - Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 3450F - Philosophy of Neuroscience
Philosophy 3501G - Epistemology
Philosophy 3601F - Metaphysics
Philosophy 3710G - Metaethics
Philosophy 3720G - Normative Ethics
Philosophy 3991G - Problems in Philosophy - Teleology
Philosophy 3992G - Free Will Debate

Philosophy 3003F - Plato

Instructor: D. Henry

An introduction to the main ideas of Plato through a reading of some of his most famous dialogues, including: Apology, Phaedo, Crito, Euthyphro, Symposium, Meno, Protagoras, Theaetetus, Republic (selections) and Philebus. Topics be be covered include: the philosophic way of life, the nature of knowledge and learning, the theory of Forms, the soul, ethics and politics, pleasure, love and aesthetics.

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Philosophy 3006G - Aristotle

Instructor: J. Thorp

This course attempts to give students a deepened, but still broad, understanding of Aristotle by means of the careful study of a series of twelve celebrated texts.  The subjects of the selected texts will be: the ontology of the Categories, the foundations of semantics, the status of future contingents, the refutation of the Theory of Forms, the defense of the Principle of Non-Contradiction, the theory of truth, the definition of soul, the theory of animal reproduction, the refutation of the void, the resolution of Zeno's paradoxes, the nature of mathematics and the object of metaphysics.

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Philosophy 3027F - Berkeley

Instructor: B. Hill

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Philosophy 3170F - Topics in the History of Ethics

Instructor: A. Skelton

Classical utilitarianism is the view according to which the only fundamental requirement of morality is to maximize surplus aggregate well-being. The historically most important defense of this view appears in Henry Sidgwick’s (1838-1900) The Methods of Ethics. While The Methods of Ethics has influenced many important philosophers, including G. E. Moore, John Rawls and Derek Parfit, its main meta-ethical and normative theses are not widely known. Accordingly, this course is designed to familiarize students with the nature and significance of those theses.

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Philosophy 3170G - Topics in the History of Ethics

Instructor: B. Hill

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Philosophy 3201B: Special Topics in Logical Theory

Instructor: J. Bell

This course provides an introductionj to more advanced topics in logic, and makes extensive employment of the method of truth trees, a working knowledge of which (for classicial logic) is presupposed. Topics include: basic set theory, interpretations of first-order logic, second-order logic, contextual (modal) and intuitionistic propositional logic.

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Philosophy 3310F - Philosophy of Time and Chance

Instructor: 

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Philosophy 3320F - Quantum Mechanics

Instructor: W. Myrvold

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Philosophy 3410G - Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Mind

Instructor: A. Mendelovici

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Philosophy 3420G - Philosophy of Psychology

Instructor: C. Viger

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Philosophy 3450F - Philosophy of Neuroscience

Instructor: J. Sullivan

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Philosopy 3501G - Epistemology

Instructor:

An advanced introduction to the theory of knowledge. A number of representative positions ranging from standard analytic epistemology to naturalized epistemology on the issues of knowledge and epistemic justification will be compared and contrasted.

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Philosophy 3601F - Metaphysics

Instructor: K. Matsubara

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Philosophy 3710G - Metaethics

Instructor: R. Robb

The main function of this course is to introduce students to some of the main problems and approaches in contemporary meta-ethics. Meta-ethics involves the study of the presuppositions of moral discourse and normative ethical theorizing and is therefore concerned with epistemological, metaphysical and semantic issues, among others.

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Philosophy 3720G - Normative Ethics

Instructor: A. Skelton

This course is devoted to examining a number of problems in contemporary normative ethics. We will focus in particular on the debate between utilitarianism and its deontological detractors, aggregation, issues in population ethics, and select theories of value.

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Philosophy 3991G - Problems in Philosophy - Teleology

Instructor: D. Henry

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Philosophy 3992G - Free Will Debate

Instructor: L. Falkenstein

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