Department of PhilosophyWestern Arts and Humanities

3000 Level Courses

Philosophy 3006G - Aristotle
Philosophy 3012F - Medieval Philosophy
Philosophy 3026G - Locke
Philosophy 3040G - Origins of Analytic Philosophy
Philosophy 3170F - Topics in History of Ethics
Philosophy 3270F - Philosophy and Linguistics
Philosophy 3450G - Philosophy of Neuroscience
Philosophy 3501F - Epistemology
Philosophy 3601G - Metaphysics
Philosophy 3710F - Metaethics
Philosophy 3720G - Normative Ethics
Philosophy 3993F - The Ethics of Science/The Science of Ethics I

Philosophy 3006G - Aristotle

Instructor: J. Thorp

This course attempts to give students a deepened, but still broad, understanding of Aristotle by means of the careful study of a series of twelve celebrated texts.  The subjects of the selected texts will be: the ontology of the Categories, the foundations of semantics, the status of future contingents, the refutation of the Theory of Forms, the defense of the Principle of Non-Contradiction, the theory of truth, the definition of soul, the theory of animal reproduction, the refutation of the void, the resolution of Zeno's paradoxes, the nature of mathematics and the object of metaphysics.

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Philosophy 3012F - Medieval Philosophy

Instructor: B. Hill

This is a topically structured survey of the main themes and debates constituting medieval European philosophy. The material will cover, roughly, the period from 400 CE through 1400 CE. Topics to be explored include the natures of theology, logic, and Scientia, the problem of universals, divine illumination, abstraction, knowledge and skepticism, the metaphysic structure of bodies, causation, human nature and the soul, essence and existence, God’s essence and existence, the nature of goodness, freedom of the will, the virtues and happiness, and the divine and natural law. Figures to be studied include Augustine, Boethius, Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, Averroes, Anselm, Ockham, Scotus, Buridan, Avicenna, and others. This course is perfect for students of philosophy as well as medieval studies students and will provide an introduction to basic issues and figures important for intellectual history in the medieval period, the history of the church in the medieval period, the history of universities, the history of theology in the medieval period, and the history of science in the medieval period as well as the history of philosophy.

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Philosophy 3026G - Locke

Instructor:  B. Hill

An intermediate study of Locke’s Essay concerning human understanding and of related works and correspondence, both by Locke and his critics.

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Philosophy 3040G: Origins of Analytic Philosophy

Instructor: R. DiSalle

The investigation of selected philosophical problems as they arise in the writings of such philosophers as Moore, Frege, Russell, Ayer, Carnap, Quine, Wittgenstein, Ryle, Austin, and others. Problems addressed may include philosophical methodology, ethical theory, metaphysics, meaning, and epistemology.

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Philosophy 3170F - Topics in the History of Ethics

Instructor: A. Skelton

This course is devoted to some of the main meta-ethical and normative ethical doctrines found in the works of Henry Sidgwick (1838-1900) and G. E. Moore (1873-1958). In Sidgwick, our focus will be on his arguments for the claim that the notion “ought” cannot be defined, that it is possible to establish the truth of utilitarianism (including hedonism), and that there is a dualism at the heart of practical reason (that utilitarianism and egoism are coordinate but conflicting requirements of reason). In Moore, our focus will be on arguments for the claim that the notion “good” cannot be defined, that more than pleasure has intrinsic value, that egoism is self-contradictory, and that there are organic unities (that the value of a whole is not equivalent to the sum of the value of its parts). The last few weeks will be devoted to some critical reaction to Sidgwick and Moore. 

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Philosophy 3270F - Philosophy and Linguistics

Instructor: R. Stainton

Philosophical perspectives on linguistic issues and the science of linguistics. Sample topics: the evidence base for linguistics; what linguistics should take as its proper subject matter; interfaces between syntax, semantics and pragmatics.

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Philosophy 3450G - Philosophy of Neuroscience

Instructor:  J. Sullivan

Introduction to philosophy of neuroscience. Questions may include: What does neuroscience tell us about the mind-brain relationship, free will and moral responsibility, or the mechanisms of learning and memory? Is consciousness a mental, behavioral or brain state? What is the structure of explanation in neuroscience? Is psychology reducible to neuroscience?

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Philosopy 3501F - Epistemology

Instructor: J. Sullivan

An advanced introduction to the theory of knowledge. A number of representative positions ranging from standard analytic epistemology to naturalized epistemology on the issues of knowledge and epistemic justification will be compared and contrasted.

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Philosophy 3601G - Metaphysics

Instructor: J. Thorp

An introduction to current debate on metaphysical questions. Topics may include the nature of space and time, the status of phenomenal sensible qualities, the existence of natural kinds, causality and determinism, counterfactuals and possible worlds, identity and individuation, and personal identity.

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Philosophy 3710F - Metaethics

Instructor: R. Robb

Metaethics is the area of moral philosophy in which we inquire about, among other things, the status of moral claims, the meaning of moral terms, the rational justification of morality, the nature of value, and issues of moral psychology. This course is an advanced study of topics in metaethics.

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Philosophy 3720G - Normative Ethics

Instructor: A. Skelton

This course is devoted to examining a number of problems in contemporary normative ethics. We will focus in particular on the debate between utilitarianism and its deontological detractors, aggregation, issues in population ethics, and select theories of value.

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Philosophy 3993F - The Ethics of Science/The Science of Ethics I

Instructors: G. Barker

Course Outline