Undergraduate Courses

Timetable: please click here

 

What are the different Types of Course Delivery?


In-Person
As long as the university considers face-to-face instruction with proper social distancing measures safe, these courses will be taught in-person in a classroom on campus with strict adherence to public health protocols.

Online
In this course type, all teaching activities will take place online with no time-slot assigned (asynchronously). You may access the course material any time you wish; there are no mandatory synchronous activities at a specified time during the week.

Blended
Blended courses have both face-to-face and online instruction.

  

Course descriptions: please click here

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf. when available
  • Note: Course outlines for 2022-2023 will be available in August-September.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Course Delivery Type

AH 1642A

Art History and Visual Culture: Baroque to Contemporary

C. Sprengler

Online

AH 1648B

Collecting Art and Culture

S. Anderson

Online

AH 2600F

Theories and Practices of Art History and Visual Culture

M. Hyett

Online

AH 2636F

Baroque in Europe and the Iberian Territories

M. Flores Barba

Blended

AH 2650G

History of Photography

S. Bassnett

Online

AH 2662G

Art and Mass Media

C. Sprengler

Online

AH 3636G

Art from Latin America in Canada

A. Robin

In-Person

AH 3638F

Death in Mexican Art: From Ancient Times to Today

A. Robin

In-Person

AH 3660G

Hollywood and Cinema

C. Sprengler

Blended

AH 3696G

Special Topics in Art History: Paradise Found

I. Kazi In-Person

AH 4636F

Seminar in the Art of the Americas: Painting in Hispanic America

C. Barteet In-Person

AH 4642G

Making Art with Environmental Awareness

K. Wood

Online

AH 4692F

Special Topics in Art History: Art and Food

A. White In-Person

AH 4694G

Special Topics in Art History: Art and Food

Z. Heyn-Jones Online

 

Course descriptions: please click here

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.
  • Note: Course outlines for 2022-2023 will be available in August-September.

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Course Delivery Type

SA 1601

Foundations of Visual Arts

T. Johnson

Blended

SA 1605 (001)

Advanced Visual Arts Foundation Studio

A. Madelska

In-Person

SA 1605 (002)

Advanced Visual Arts Foundation Studio

J. Karuhanga

In-Person

SA 2504Y

Art Now!

L. Eurich

In-Person

SA 2602A

Studio Seminar I

J. Karuhanga

In-Person

SA 2610A

Introduction to Drawing

A. Madelska

In-Person

SA 2610B

Introduction to Drawing

S. Nault

In-Person

SA 2620A

Introduction to Painting

S. Nault In-Person

SA 2620B

Introduction to Painting

S. Glabush In-Person

SA 2630A

Introduction to Print Media

T. Johnson In-Person

SA 2630B

Introduction to Print Media

T. Johnson In-Person

SA 2643

Introduction to Sculpture and Installation

S. Esfahani

In-Person

SA 2652Y

Introduction to Digital Photo

C. Carney

Online

SA 2662A

Time-Based Video & Animation

D. Sneppova In-Person

SA 2663

Introduction to Time-Based Media Art

S. Nault In-Person

SA 2690Y

Special Topics in Studio Art: Ceramics & Clay Art

G. Shepherd In-Person

SA 3602B

Studio Seminar II

J. Karuhanga In-Person

SA 3611

Drawing

G. Shepherd In-Person

SA 3623

Painting

S. Glabush In-Person

SA 3633

Print Media

P. Mahon In-Person

SA 3640B

Sculpture: Alternative Materials

S. Esfahani

In-Person

SA 3650B

Photography: Outdoors and Architecture

K. Wood

Blended

SA 3662B

Time-Based Media Art: Video D. Sneppova

In-Person

SA 3672B

Embroidering with the Guid: A Community Engagement Learning Course T. Johnson

In-Person

SA 3678A

Death in Mexican Art: From Ancient Times to Today A. Robin

In-Person

SA 4603

Experiential Learning

 

In-Person

SA 4605

Practicum

A. Madelska

In-Person

SA 4642B

Making Art with Environmental Awareness

K. Wood

Online

SA 4690A

Special Projects in Studio: Inside/Outside

S. Glabush

In-Person

SA 4692B

Special Projects in Studio: Art and Food

 Z. Heyn-Jones

Online

SA 4693A

Special Projects in Studio: Art and Food

 A. White

In-Person

 

Course descriptions: please click here

  • Click the course number to download the outline as a pdf.
  • Note: Course outlines for 2022-2023 will be available in August-September. 

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Course Delivery Type

MCS 2610F

The Greatest Shows on Earth

R. Skinner

In-Person

MCS 3610G

Controversies and Contestations: Museums

H. Gregory

In-Person

MCS 3620A

Intro to Exhibition Design and Museum Management H. Gregory

In-Person

MCS 3636G

Art from Latin America in Canada A. Robin

In-Person

MCS 3638F

Death in Mexican Art: From Ancient Times to Today A. Robin

In-Person

MCS 4690F

Special Topics in MCS: Art and Food A. White

In-Person

MCS 4691F

Special Topics in MCS: Waste Stream/Waste Dream K. Robertson

In-Person

MCS 4692G

Special Topics in MCS: Art and Food Z. Heyn-Jones

Online

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AH 3696G - Special Topics: Paradise Found: Un/tamed Nature in Early Modern Art

Instructor I. Kazi

This course will explore fourteenth to seventeenth-century sites and artistic developments through the examination of natural spaces. Nature, both tamed and untamed, has been present in art in countless ways, including being a source of inspiration, the background or subject of images, materials, and places where art can be created and discussed. By focusing on European art, along with Colonial Latin American and Islamic cultures, the course will explore the interconnections between natural space and art. Classes will be organized spatially with examinations of divine spaces, untamed natural places, and "tamed" spaces/gardens. Through the application of classical (Vitruvius), Renaissance (Alberti), modern (Foucault, de Certeau, Bachelard, and Lefebvre) theories of space and queer ecology (Sandilands), students will consider the complex relationship between the representation of early modern places and matters of power, gender, gaze, and colonization that continue to affect our present environment and notions of race and gender. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will study these cultures and artworks from the perspectives of art history, architecture, landscape design, history, literature and sustainability.

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AH 4636F/VISARTS 9566A/9666A - Special Topics: Painting in Hispanic America

Professor C. Barteet

This course considers the development of painting in select regions of Hispanic America from the 1500s to the early 1800s. Our approach to this approximately 300-year period will evolve around the following nine themes over the course’s term: 1) European representations of the Americas; 2) Iberian and monarchial pictorial claims to supremacy; 3) the role of print culture; 4) Indigenous engagements with European religious art; 5) Indigenous representations of the Americas; 6) the evolution of guilds and the academies; 7) the picturing of class and race; 8) the various roles of portraiture; and 9) the role of Marian cult imagery. Through these topic areas we will develop critical understandings of how the pictorial arts in Hispanic America developed over the colonial era through dynamic and continued negotiations between peoples of European and Indigenous descent to create a uniquely American artistic culture. In so doing we will consider issues of religion, race, gender, and identity broadly defined.

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AH 4692F/MCS 4690F/SA 4693A/VISARTS 9567A/9667A - Special Topics: Art and Food - Relational Perspectives

Instructor A. White

In this two-part class, which can be taken separately or as a whole, students will be engaged in creative responses to contemporary issues around food and agriculture. From the personal-relational to the global-social scale we will examine food systems and agriculture through the lens of the arts and research-creation. This course is interdisciplinary in focus and foregrounds experiential learning in local and international settings.

The first half of the course will focus on critical artistic approaches to food and agriculture from a relational, personal perspective. Drawing on theory from the environmental humanities, critical plant studies, feminist perspectives, science-fictional ecologies and biological arts, we will examine personal and physical relationships with the world through the food that we eat. Students will be introduced to these ideas using interdisciplinary and research-creation approaches and examples (studio, kitchen, field trips, art historical texts, etc.) with a particular focus on edible plants, and plants in agriculture. This half of the course will provide the foundation and theoretical basis that will be built upon in the second half, as well as rooting the course in a regional context.

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AH 4694G/MCS 4692G/SA 4692B/VISARTS 9581B/9681B - Special Topics: Art and Food - Hemipheric Perspectives

Instructor Z. Heyn-Jones

In this two-part class, which can be taken separately or as a whole, students will be engaged in creative responses to contemporary issues around food and agriculture. From the personal-relational to the global-social scale we will examine food systems and agriculture through the lens of the arts and research-creation. This course is interdisciplinary in focus and foregrounds experiential learning in local and international settings.

In part two we will take a wider lens, moving from personal sustenance and community sovereignty to connections across the Americas and issues of labour, migration and the climate emergency more broadly. Looking at the relationship between Mexico and Canada we will connect the local to the global, exploring flows of plants, produce, and people. Students will have the opportunity to visit Mexico City for 10 days over reading week in order to gain invaluable first-hand experience with precolonial cuisines and agricultural techniques, innovative urban agriculture projects, and the scale of industrial food systems that feed the hemisphere’s largest city and beyond.

The urgent problems we face connected to global food systems—from hunger and food insecurity to greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation—demand creative and innovative solutions. For this reason, food is a natural and vital topic to explore through the arts. This course asks: how can artistic and curatorial practices engage meaningfully with issues of food security, sovereignty and justice across the hemisphere?

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MCS 4691F - Special Topics: Waste Stream/Waste Dream: Addressing the Environmental Impact of Curatorial Practice

Professor K. Robertson

This class considers the waste streams created by curatorial practice alongside projects that imagine different futures for museums and artists. For decades, conservators and other museum professionals have studied how to keep pollutants (such as dirt, particulate, noxious gases) out of museums and have created carefully controlled environments to keep artworks and artefacts in as static conditions as possible. But this has had unexpected results. In trying to keep pollutants out, museums themselves have become massive polluters. This class addresses the waste streams and carbon footprints of museums. But it also looks at how artists, curators, and museum professionals are imagining radical futures for the display of art and cultural heritage. The course is organized around a series of talks from experts in the field and an exhibition of artist and curator Suzanne Carte’s Artist Material Fund, which will show in London in the Artlab beginning in November, 2022. Students will participate in the curating, programming, and installation of the exhibition and will develop a series of creative assignments in response to course content. As museums around the globe develop sustainability initiatives, this class will give students the knowledge and skills to be at the forefront of a sea change in the museum world.

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SA 2690Y - Special Topics: Ceramics & Clay Art

Instructor: G. Shepherd

An introduction to the medium of clay, focusing on hand-built ceramic sculptures and functional forms using a wide range of techniques demonstrated and discussed in bi-weekly classes. Projects will encourage learning through experimentation in scale and series in order to develop personal preferences and ability. No previous experience is required.

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 SA 4690A - Special Topics: Inside/Outside: Examining the studio as site of material, intuitive and critical exploration

Professor S. Glabush

The idea of the studio conjures up images of the lone artist in a garret suffering for their creation. Critics like Rosalind Kraus have long since destabilized this idea and questioned the materially specific language of painting and sculpture in favour of broader definitions characterized by the “expanded field.” But recently many artists are returning to notions of the studio and materially specific languages in favour of an approach that embraces the métier of the studio, the history of art and reimagining and revisioning traditions.

The purpose of this seminar will be to define and explore each student’s relationship to their studio practice by closely examining their own processes but also engaging in a dialogue with professional artists through site visits, studio visits lectures and seminars. This course will alternate between seminars designed by the students and conducted inside the department with travelling outside the university and engaging with artists, curators, and others in the field. During our field work and discussions engendered in the studio, this course will provide a weekly forum of engagement with the ongoing material production and research of students. The course will be structured around seminars of each student’s artistic production and a close analysis of ideas related to contemporary art.

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